Biointerfaces Institute

Redefining collaboration in the physical and life sciences

Contact Us: 734.763.7924
Email: Biointerfaces.Info@umich.edu

People

Tim Bruns

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering

Microfluidics & Sensors

Developing microelectrode interfaces with the nervous system for functional control and to investigate systems level neurophysiology.

Bruns Lab

 

 

Cindy Chestek

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering

Microfluidics & Sensors

The Chestek lab focuses on brain machine interface (BMI) systems using 100 channel arrays implanted in motor and pre-motor cortex. The goal is to eventually develop clinically viable systems to enable paralyzed individuals to control prosthetic limbs, as well as their own limbs using functional electrical stimulation and assistive exoskeletons. The group is currently pursuing dexterous control of finger movements and optogenetic stimulation in sensory cortex for feedback.

Chestek Lab

 

 

Tae-Hwa Chun

Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine

Cell & Tissue Engineering

The clinical interests of the Chun Group address pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and its cardiovascular consequences. The Chun Group research interests include the role of tissue remodeling in the progression of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

Chun Lab

 

 

Sharon Glotzer

John Werner Cahn Distinguished University Professor of Engineering Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering; Professor: Material Science & Engineering, Physics; Applied Physics; and Macromolecular Science and Engineering

Nanotechnology

Glotzer’s research on computational assembly science and engineering aims toward predictive materials design of colloidal and soft matter, with current emphasis on shape, packing, and assembly pathways.

Glotzer lab

 

 

Peter Green

Vincent T. and Gloria M. Gorguze Professor of Engineering; Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Applied Physics; Director, Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion: a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center

Nanotechnology

Research in the Green Group is devoted to developing a fundamental understanding of, and controlling, the structure and properties of "soft" materials for applications that include: energy conversion, active and passive coatings, membranes, sensors and organic electronic and electrorheology.

Green Lab

 

 

Evan Keller

Professor, Urology; Professor, Pathology ; Associate Professor of Comparative Pathology

Cell & Tissue Engineering

Keller Lab

 

 

Jinsang Kim

Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering

Biomaterials & Drug Delivery

Kim's Smart Functional Polymer Lab explores functional polymeric materials and their nanostructural assembly to develop advanced polymeric objects. The research focuses on the rational molecular design, chemical and/or biological synthesis, and molecular assembly of functional polymers. Research topics include self-signal amplifying molecular chemical and biosensors, biomimetic conducting polymers and adhesives, molecular actuators for bio-related applications and conjugated polymer-based flexible solar cells, and highly emissive metal-free organic emitters for optoelectroic applications.

Kim Lab

 

 

Nicholas Kotov

Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka Professor of Engineering, Professor, Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, and Biomedical Engineering.

Nanotechnology

Research in the Kotov Group focuses on self-organization of nanocolloids, layer-by-layer assembly, ultrastrong nanocomposites, tissue engineering with nanomaterials, nanoscale drugs, and implantable biomedical devices.

Kotov Lab

 

 

Paul Krebsbach

Roy Roberts Professor of Dentistry; Professor and Chair, Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, UM School of Dentistry

Cell & Tissue Engineering

Research in the Krebsbach Lab is on understanding the molecular basis of self renewal and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. This also relates to their study of the factors that regulate the differentiation of these cells towards a mesenchymal stem cell phenotype. Accomplishing these goals is an important prerequisite to the development of therapeutic protocols using pluripotent stem cells to regenerate human tissues.

Krebsbach Lab

 

 

Joerg Lahann

Professor, Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering Biointerfaces Institute - Director

Biomaterials & Drug Delivery

Research in the Lahann Lab focuses on surface engineering, advanced polymers, biomimetic materials, engineered stem cell microenvironments, drug delivery, and nano-scale self-assembly.

Lahann Lab

 

 

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